Sundog –noun 1. parhelion. 2. a small or incomplete rainbow.

Posts tagged “allergies

A Temporary Hiatus

Sorry for the long delay in posts. The process of finding safe housing is proving to be most difficult and has caused a marked decline in health. Jeremy and I are making it by as always with a smile in our hearts and hope in our eyes. With some luck, we’ll find a new place to live soon that is a healing environment and with considerably less stress than our current apartment.

Sundog Tales will most certainly be continuing just as soon as I’ve the oomph for more adventures! Hugs to all! Lisa

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Metamorphosis

I feel as though life is currently lived in a haze of passing moments. It is difficult at times to capture what is going on around me as I’m still trying to adjust to their speed. Living in the woods for nearly 10 years was a different world than the one I life in now.

I rose when the sun was up and the animals made enough racket to wake me. Life followed the seasons and weather, Each winter I rested while dreaming of warmer days. I would initially welcome spring bringing new life back into the forest around me, then curse it for the alder tree pollens that nearly crippled me with allergies each year. Summer would come as a blaze of warmth and sunshine, drowsy hours spent resting in the sun and locking away the memory to be cherished next snow storm. The autumn would bring a welcome crispness to the air and spur me to finish all my winter preparations.

Life was much simpler as each season had its own pace and little to hurry me before the next season began to make itself known.

Over the years I would often dream of once again living indoors. Things would be easier, I would feeling safer – being warm. One thing I always forgot to add into the details was the flow life takes when you have places to be and things to do.

I feel as though time stood still while I lived in a tent, events moving around me to change the world I live in, but ultimately not touching me. I saw a war, a new president, our economy plummet, avian flu bugs, cellphone use explode to a way of life, gas prices sky rocket, the internet become a culture – all of this and more as though looking on through a one way mirror.

Now life feels considerably different. Trying to reintegrate with a world that has flown by me, it can be … tricky. Things others take for granted after years of living in the American culture of the 21st century, I am coming into having read about it, but not personally experiencing it. It’s like reading a guidebook before you get to your destination – things are familiar, but you still have to learn your way around.

While the last 10 years of illness are hazy in my memory (its surprising how quickly the tent is fading away), the previous healthy years of life as a college student and bookstore clerk are surprisingly clear and sharp. This has caused an odd juxtaposition of lives to needing to be merge: The one knows how to live in a fast paced world, but approached it as a healthy and vigorous 24 year old; verses the one who knows how to live with chronic illness and in sync with the seasons of life.

Trying to merge these two dynamic halves into a whole has been both invigorating and stressful.

Last summer I awoke in a new world and a new place, considerably changed from when I fell asleep 10 years ago. As I move through my new surroundings, I am letting fall behind the shackles that bound me, and stepping forth into the rainbow of possibility before me to discover who I have become.


Sundog Tales is on a Brief Hold

For the last month I’ve been having some persistent difficulties with my health. Shortly before moving here I received some blood work back showing my white blood cell count was low – aka, my immune system was weak.

Combine that with an enormous amount of exposure to viruses now that I’m able to get out in the world again and it leaves one at times feeling a bit under the weather. The last few months it has been a mild case of the flu or cold, over within a day or two until the next one would hit a few weeks later.

However, for the last month I’ve had bronchitis. With my history of mild asthma it makes for a bit of a mess. I am slowly recovering and doing much better than I was a few weeks ago, but still having some breathing trouble most days.

This leads to yet still more fatigue, increased recovery time for anything physically strenuous, more things feeling physically strenuous than normal, and a whole lot more time spent resting.

I have a fun project planned for Sundog Tales in the (hopefully) near future.

Until then I shall keep working on beating this virus and recovering from the strain it is putting on my body.


Life is an Ever Changing Wonder

It’s another sunny day here in the Pacific Northwest. Starting into the best time of year – not too cold, not too many bugs, and a few more sunny days. It only lasts about a month, usually most of April though this year it is late.

Life has been moving quickly for us the last few weeks. It seemed a slow, sluggish mire we had fallen into over the winter was going to plague us all spring. Then one morning someone turned the “LIFE” switch from ‘off’ over to ‘on’ and life began to take form around us.

It’s odd to say life started when obviously I’m still breathing and getting into mischief. However there is a difference between being alive and living.

This last 18 months I have found myself learning to live again and growing beyond my physical boundaries. Then the late snows in February and March crashed our health; it is very physically and mentally taxing to live in a tent during frequent snows. My world narrowed again to survival – just getting by for another week, another month, waiting to feel less awful. Thankfully an easy allergy season helped and in April we started to move past survival and back into living again.

As I am happily remembering, there is also a difference between living and thriving.

Two weeks ago everything changed in 24 hours. Living became Thriving. I think the last time we found ourselves thriving was in 2005. Before that… 2001, during the few months before life took a nose dive into the world of chronic CFS/MCS.

It’s been a long, hard road we walk in this life of illness.

The big news going along with this change is that we finally will have the means to find indoor housing. Yup, this couple in the woods will one day soon become homeless no more.

I find the prospect both terrifying and exhilarating at the same time.

Where will we go? What sort of place will we rent? I honestly don’t know, though we are planning on answering those questions this summer. With a bit of luck, we’ll be indoors by November; we’ve had enough of living outside during Winter.

Times like these it is hard not to jump into the first opportunity that comes along. Our health concerns and the restrictions it places on housing means we must move slowly to ensure a safe living situation is found.

It also means we opted not to see the naturopath last week. As we are not certain to be staying in the local area, we didn’t want to establish care with a new doctor (a costly endeavor) and then repeat the process in another few months. However, we have followed up on a considerable amount of blood work through Dr. Buscher and will know the results in a few weeks.

Where to live when the world has suddenly opened itself up to you once more?

How to get there and more importantly, how to find safe housing?

What type of change will all this have on our health?

I am looking forwards to finding the answers to these and other questions, which swirl around in my waking and dreaming thoughts.


Update

Much time has passed since my last post. I hoped for inspiration to strike and provide a brilliant return post to share – but alas the brainfog continues to shroud my muse.

My hands have healed well. We made it through several weeks of on/off snow, but then crashed and are still recovering. The majority of spring allergies never hit this year as the snow changed up pollinating schedules for the alders above us. Western Washington is still having more rainfall than normal – and lately colder temperatures too.

It has been a very long time since I felt warm sunshine and I miss its tender kiss upon my face.

All in all – survived another winter. Hooray!

I have come out of this winter with a new plan of action. We will be seeing a local naturopath on May 5th and setting up medical treatment through her. The annual trek to see Dr. Buscher will not be happening this year. The stress and body strain from weeks of snow took a lot out of us. We simply don’t have the stamina to travel two hours away to see our doctor.

Fingers crossed we hit the right naturopath first try. I spoke briefly with her and have hope she will be a good fit for us. At the least, I don’t think we are walking into the nightmare situation almost every CFS or MCS patient has experienced – the doctor who doesn’t believe our illnesses are real.

Happy Spring Everyone!


Paleo Cookie Pancakes!

With the holidays upon us, seemed a good time to share our recipe for Paleo Pancakes. These are a bit different than many similar recipes online as we designed them to be high density protein with a good dose of veggies – basically, a balanced paleo meal for times without the ability to cook. Turned out, they are tasty anytime!

Better yet – they taste a bit like cookies!

They are a sugar free, gluten free, organic, ready to go meal.

I’m sure the hemp powder we use can be substituted for other nut flours, we just needed the big protein gains during cold times without cooking.

Paleo Cookie Pancakes:

1 cup mashed squash
1/2 cup hemp powder
1/2 cup walnut flour
1/2 cup coconut milk
6 eggs

Lots of cinnamon (to taste)
Light cloves
1 tbl ginger powder
1/2 tsp salt, or to taste

Mix the hemp and walnut flour with the coconut milk. Mix in the mashed squash. Add eggs and mix well. Add spices or substitute for pumpkin pie spice.

It should have the consistency of thick pancake batter. Can add a few chopped nuts or berries to the batter for texture and bursts of flavor.

Scoop 1/4 cup of mixture onto a hot skillet or griddle, use plenty of butter or coconut oil to prevent sticking. Cook on a low heat, they burn a little easier than other pancakes.

Flip each pancake when the bottom side firms up, like normal pancakes. Cook some more until done!

These tend to be thin, but fluffy due to the egg content. Two pancakes each makes a filling meal for us. I did not write down how many the recipe makes, but its around 9-12 cakes.

We usually eat these plain, but for special occasions (like birthdays) we’ll put a little vanilla ice cream on top. Wow they are good!

It would be easy to substitute many of the ingredients. The squash helps balance the acidic nut flours, helps provide carbohydrates, and keeps the pancakes moist. Bananas, pumpkin, yams, etc would all work well in its place. There are different types of nut flours, you can experiment with finding the one that suits your taste buds the most.

Enjoy and Happy Holidays!


and the march continues on…

Have I mentioned that I love my doctor?

I had an appointment with Dr. Buscher this morning, by phone because of the great difficulty in personally seeing him. It was time to check-in with him as to our last six months and go over what testing Jeremy and I should have before seeing him in person this summer.

It was exciting to have a lot to tell him about and the whole appointment helped put the last six months into perspective for me. The last two months have left me feeling pretty lousy at times because of all the allergy and sinus troubles, along with Jeremy’s candida treatments causing a lot of MCS troubles for both of us.

Talking to Dr. Buscher today helped me to see that we have been incredibly busy on improving our health these last six months and that we have actually seen a lot of improvements from it all.

It can be difficult at times to set aside a few months of feeling worse and realize that there have been a lot of abnormal circumstances, one after another, which has been greatly influencing our health. Having Dr. Buscher ask a few key questions along the way helped to remind me that prior to all this odd stuff going on for us, we really were seeing substantial improvements.

Our MCS reactions had been getting noticeably less and our energy had been improving. I was feeling much less brain fog, enough such that I was looking forwards to having our car fixed and renewing my driver’s license.

Most people do not know this, but I had even begun trying to find us housing that would be safe for us and on our budget. I had one very possible lead with a man who owned an organic farm and wanted to talk with me about some housing he could offer.

Then allergy season hit weeks early, my health dropped quickly and we had to go right back into survival mode because there was no other option. Driving, moving indoors, or anything of that nature had again been pulled out of our reach.

Remembering the improvements we had made, albeit briefly, helps to renew my faith that we are on the right path and doing the right things. We just need time to recover from all that has happened these last two months and then I have little doubt that we will be seeing big improvements once again.

As for my doctor appointment this morning, Dr. Buscher sounded enthusiastic about the changes we have made on our own since last seeing him – the largest having gone paleo. He approved of the tweaks I have made/will make on my own to our supplements – our increased fish oil, beginning some iodine, changing up the type of magnesium we take, calcium, and doing our vitamin b12 shots every three days instead of 1-2x’s a week.

He also gave me the reassurance I needed to hear that my thinking had been sound in not supplementing with thyroid medication after we had a large reaction to it the first day we tried it and instead waiting to see how our thyroid changed on its own after we got our diet and supplements changed up.

We will be retesting our levels of vitamin D, hormones, thyroid, and a new one – vitamin K. Jeremy and I will also be finishing up with an amino acid panel from last year. I’m curious to see how some of these numbers have changed with all that has been improved upon since last October.

Dr. Buscher is a wonderful doctor who is incredibly supportive. He really cares for his patients. This is very obvious in the questions he asks and the excitement he shares when hearing of improvements. Most people who have CFS, MCS, FM, PTSD or other odd illnesses know how rare it is to find a doctor who is supportive, caring, and knowledgeable. I am incredibly lucky to have found one and always enjoy my appointments with him.